dgolfnut

Exterior wall - stone up to window bottom - siding above

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I am using HD Suite 2015.  The house has a walk out basement.  The front elevation will be stone from ground level up to the bottom of the 1st floor windows.  Above the stone will be siding. Is there a way to do this so it shows right in 3d view??

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Several ways to do this in PRO, not sure of Suite.

 

In the Wall Specification dialog > Wall Covering you may apply materials.

 

You might be able to define a new wall type with the appropriate materials and use it as needed.

 

Some searching/reading of reference material should bring up additional details.

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Even though I use Pro, I use a technique that is certainly achievable in Suite.  I place a stone textured soffit of an appropriate thickness on the outside surface of my walls.  I also cap them with another soffit.  See below for an example past project of mine.

 

Mentioned in the original post was that the stone only came up to the bottom of the windows, and the above technique can do that fairly quickly.  If, on the other hand, you need the stone texture partially above the bottom of your windows similar to Eric's example, this can also be done but with extra effort.  See the siding below the windows on the front porch in the example below, where I added multiple soffits of varying heights to wrap around the bottom of the windows.

 

post-251-0-80917300-1415420230_thumb.jpg

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Does Suite have Pony Walls ? , set bottom to stone, top to siding.

 

set it up in Defaults before you start drawing the exterior walls.....

 

post-25-0-85749800-1415424580_thumb.jpg

 

 

 

 

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Hi dgolfnut,

    Just wondering if you found a solution?  I am currently creating my home (construction start  in 2 months) and dealing with the same issue. I'm wanting to create 48" cultured stone panels at grade.  Suite 2015. 

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@dgolfnut

 

Did you read through the thread? Answers are all there.

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Hi dgolfnut,

    Just wondering if you found a solution?  I am currently creating my home (construction start  in 2 months) and dealing with the same issue. I'm wanting to create 48" cultured stone panels at grade.  Suite 2015. 

Suite doesn't have Pony Walls, which are the actual tool designed to accomplish this specific task.

If you don't want to upgrade to gain this tool, instead, you can use a Closed box geometric Shape from the Library Browser, or a Soffit, resized to try to create the look, as discussed earlier in this thread.

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Thanks all for your input as well as your advice Katalyst. The program wasn't responding appropriately. After closing the program along with a restart, I was able to achieve what I wanted with the soffit idea.    

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Does Suite have Pony Walls ? , set bottom to stone, top to siding.

 

set it up in Defaults before you start drawing the exterior walls.....

 

attachicon.gifpony wall stone.JPG

 

How do you adjust this so the stacked stone covers the exposed foundation?

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@PacificGreen

 

Please start a new thread with your question.

 

Also:

 

 

It helps if we know what title (Suite, Pro etc) and version (2014, 2015 etc) you are using. You can add this info to your signature by clicking on your user name at the top right of the page, click My Settings, then Signature on the left. 

 

 

Resources for self help:
 
The built in Help System (always a good place to start)
 
 
 

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@PacificGreen

 

Please start a new thread with your question.

 

Also:

 

 

It helps if we know what title (Suite, Pro etc) and version (2014, 2015 etc) you are using. You can add this info to your signature by clicking on your user name at the top right of the page, click My Settings, then Signature on the left. 

 

 

Resources for self help:
 
The built in Help System (always a good place to start)
 
 
 

 

Oh great, a "solver" who doesn't solve but lectures. No thank you!

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Oh great, a "solver" who doesn't solve but lectures. No thank you!

 

That is uncalled for.  Eric has helped lots of people on this forum including me.  I think the bold text was to grab your attention as many people post questions and without knowing what version they are using it's just a shot in the dark.  If only they would read the sticky at the top then it wouldn't be necessary to remind them.

Alan

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That is uncalled for.  Eric has helped lots of people on this forum including me.  I think the bold text was to grab your attention as many people post questions and without knowing what version they are using it's just a shot in the dark.  If only they would read the sticky at the top then it wouldn't be necessary to remind them.

Alan

 

I completely disagree. A person posted a solution mentioning a pony wall along with a graphic showing the stacked stone wall covering the wall but not the exposed foundation wall. Rather than chime in with an answer to my specific, topic related inquiry I am lectured to about needing to provide my version info and needing to check other resources and that I should start a new thread. Sorry, but, I have zero patience for that. A specific question was raised regarding a specific post which is entirely on topic with the thread. Why assume that I need to provide additional information for clarification by the poster regarding his/her solution when said solution doesn't appear to address the complete issue?

 

Look, if a pony wall is not able to cover the foundation wall (which seems to be the case) then the simple answer is "that's not possible" which then makes the suggested pony wall solution for stacked stone siding skirts not really a viable solution as most all go from the ground level and up. Understanding that, then one can move on from all the excessive time put into researching all over the place to get an answer and formulate a workaround, such as some of the workarounds posed in this thread, which work regardless of version (e.g. soffits).

 

I've run a software company below and am fully aware of the complexity of software and all the various ways to accomplish a task and of how to best serve people inquiring about it. I searched various resources for an answer prior to posting so I don't appreciate the response received. If you don't know the answer to a specific question, then keep to yourself vs lecturing someone else on how they should get an answer. I don't care if someone has posted 1800 times before, if my first post to this forum is met with a lecturing response, the frequent poster has lost their understanding of what it means to welcome new users to this community.

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I completely disagree. A person posted a solution mentioning a pony wall along with a graphic showing the stacked stone wall covering the wall but not the exposed foundation wall. Rather than chime in with an answer to my specific, topic related inquiry I am lectured to about needing to provide my version info and needing to check other resources and that I should start a new thread. Sorry, but, I have zero patience for that. A specific question was raised regarding a specific post which is entirely on topic with the thread. Why assume that I need to provide additional information for clarification by the poster regarding his/her solution when said solution doesn't appear to address the complete issue?

 

Look, if a pony wall is not able to cover the foundation wall (which seems to be the case) then the simple answer is "that's not possible" which then makes the suggested pony wall solution for stacked stone siding skirts not really a viable solution as most all go from the ground level and up. Understanding that, then one can move on from all the excessive time put into researching all over the place to get an answer and formulate a workaround, such as some of the workarounds posed in this thread, which work regardless of version (e.g. soffits).

 

I've run a software company below and am fully aware of the complexity of software and all the various ways to accomplish a task and of how to best serve people inquiring about it. I searched various resources for an answer prior to posting so I don't appreciate the response received. If you don't know the answer to a specific question, then keep to yourself vs lecturing someone else on how they should get an answer. I don't care if someone has posted 1800 times before, if my first post to this forum is met with a lecturing response, the frequent poster has lost their understanding of what it means to welcome new users to this community.

I agree with your statement, but your question has been answered twice (Elovia and Katalyst). Stacked Stone is a material and it covers separately.                                                                                                                                                                                                        

 

You can't adjust the material itself, you have to add soffits, shapes and terrain features and then paint them.

 

As been stated you can use a soffit or a shape to cover the foundation and apply the material to it or you can simply paint the foundation to your liking.

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I agree with your statement, but your question has been answered twice (Elovia and Katalyst). Stacked Stone is a material and it covers separately.                                                                                                                                                                                                        

 

You can't adjust the material itself, you have to add soffits, shapes and terrain features and then paint them.

 

As been stated you can use a soffit or a shape to cover the foundation and apply the material to it or you can simply paint the foundation to your liking.

 

Thanks. Pony wall is definitely quickest and easiest (if a Pro and up user) for a partial solution. Thanks for confirming that the soffit workaround is required even in Pro if one wants the skirt to be flush to the ground. 

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If  you want to use a pony wall with the lower portion set to have a stone or brick surface, you may.  In an exterior 3D camera view, you should be able to select the lower portion of the pony wall (i.e., the stone or brick portion) which may require you to TAB a couple times until what you want is actually selected (depending on your settings).  Then, grab the lower edge of the lower wall and drag it down to cover your exposed foundation; likewise, you can drag the top up or down to vary the height, or drag a corner up or down to create an angle.  I know of no way of doing this solely using automatic tools.  You may also use the Break Line tool from the object tool bar to change the shape of the lower wall section.

 

See if this is the result you seek.

 

Keep in mind this software does no engineering, so whatever you do, make sure the design is constructable (not all are) and that it meets local building codes (not all do).

 

Good luck. :)

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Thank you. That works easy enough. Although, using the eye dropper tool and simply applying the pony wall texture to the foundation also works and appears to not leave some odd visual artifacts that crop up using the "drag wall down" method. However, your method makes the most sense for how it "should" work and I appreciate you chiming in. Thanks.

 

If  you want to use a pony wall with the lower portion set to have a stone or brick surface, you may.  In an exterior 3D camera view, you should be able to select the lower portion of the pony wall (i.e., the stone or brick portion) which may require you to TAB a couple times until what you want is actually selected (depending on your settings).  Then, grab the lower edge of the lower wall and drag it down to cover your exposed foundation; likewise, you can drag the top up or down to vary the height, or drag a corner up or down to create an angle.  I know of no way of doing this solely using automatic tools.  You may also use the Break Line tool from the object tool bar to change the shape of the lower wall section.

 

See if this is the result you seek.

 

Keep in mind this software does no engineering, so whatever you do, make sure the design is constructable (not all are) and that it meets local building codes (not all do).

 

Good luck. :)

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Those "odd visual effects" are the result of having the exterior surface of the pony wall exactly co-planar to the foundation wall.  To avoid the visual effect (also called z-fighting), you would need to re-align the foundation wall slightly (greater than zero difference from the pony wall), adjust relative thicknesses, or apply some other method to ensure the volume of pony wall face material is constructable over the face of the foundation stem wall.  I'll leave the details to you for your project.

 

This is why  I originally recommended using a soffit with the desired material applied and placing it up against the wall, so that the material has thickness in and of itself (and HDSuite, used by the original poster, can accomplish this technique).  Otherwise, spend time creating a new pony wall type with the correct materials, main build layer placement and layer thicknesses, so that when you drag the lower portion of the pony wall down over your foundation wall, it actually curtains the exterior surface of the foundation rather than embeds within it.

 

If all you want is a pretty picture (not judging: that may be the desired outcome), then changing the textures to match may be all that is necessary.

 

Good luck. :)

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Excellent feedback. Thanks for your informed commentary!

 

Those "odd visual effects" are the result of having the exterior surface of the pony wall exactly co-planar to the foundation wall.  To avoid the visual effect (also called z-fighting), you would need to re-align the foundation wall slightly (greater than zero difference from the pony wall), adjust relative thicknesses, or apply some other method to ensure the volume of pony wall face material is constructable over the face of the foundation stem wall.  I'll leave the details to you for your project.

 

This is why  I originally recommended using a soffit with the desired material applied and placing it up against the wall, so that the material has thickness in and of itself (and HDSuite, used by the original poster, can accomplish this technique).  Otherwise, spend time creating a new pony wall type with the correct materials, main build layer placement and layer thicknesses, so that when you drag the lower portion of the pony wall down over your foundation wall, it actually curtains the exterior surface of the foundation rather than embeds within it.

 

If all you want is a pretty picture (not judging: that may be the desired outcome), then changing the textures to match may be all that is necessary.

 

Good luck. :)

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