Adding "gingerbread" trim to exterior of house


kristinlindberg
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Go to solution Solved by DavidJPotter,

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Switched to Home Designer Pro 2016 from (Vanilla) AutoCAD to be able to do in-home design consultation with clients. As many of us know, more and more clients "want it now" and like to see "real life" renderings.

 

That being said, we are currently working on an entire city block for a single customer. Great right? Well, the problem is that they LOVE gingerbread trim. I've been piddling away all day trying to find something in this program that allows me to add it.

 

Is it here, or is it something found in CA only? CA's not in the budget just yet.

 

Thanks.

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You can download the free version of Sketch Up and use it to make such items for importation into Pro. It is true that Chief Premier does a lot of this by default but you can also learn how to create intricate custom things in Sketch Up. All you need is the intention to succeed.

 

DJP

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Switched to Home Designer Pro 2016 from (Vanilla) AutoCAD to be able to do in-home design consultation with clients. As many of us know, more and more clients "want it now" and like to see "real life" renderings.

 

That being said, we are currently working on an entire city block for a single customer. Great right? Well, the problem is that they LOVE gingerbread trim. I've been piddling away all day trying to find something in this program that allows me to add it.

 

Is it here, or is it something found in CA only? CA's not in the budget just yet.

 

Thanks.

Here are some images:

http://img2-2.timeinc.net/toh/i/asktoh/gingerbread-trim.jpg

http://hgtvhome.sndimg.com/content/dam/images/hgtv/fullset/2013/2/19/8/DesignLens_pink-victorian_s4x3.jpg.rend.hgtvcom.231.231.jpeg

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Objects made in Sketch Up can be resized a little bit but as you resize such things their shape is also deformed, so one must be very exact in Sketch up before importation. Such intricacy will take a lot of patience on your part and is a LOT of work for such an effect.

 

DJP

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Great thanks. I have never been hip to the Sketchup scene, for some reason it's always been difficult for me to model with sketchup. Unsure why, but it's been on my "learn this soon" list for a few years now. Maybe now is the time to learn. Grasping at straws here - I could likely draw in AutoCAD and import that into Sketchup, you think?

 

I will try and see how it goes. Will be worth it for the client and myself if I figure this out. Entire city block to build homes and ADU's. Maybe then I'll buy CA ;)

 

Thanks so much.

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  • Solution

Whether you use Chief Premier or Home Designer Pro, the hard part will be in Sketch Up, the suggestion by chiefuserrick

that you start in AutoCAD (something you are familiar with) and then importing to Sketch Up for converting to a 3D symbol is a GOOD idea, worth trying. Few types of objects are more intricate work than what you want to do ("gingerbread" trim) so creating it in a familiar application is paramount.

 

DJP

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Yes, you can start in AutoCad (2D), import to Sketchup to generate a 3D object. Then import into HD Pro. Try something simple to understand what X/Y/Z orientation that you need to create in Sketchup. This is how I made my custom truss objects for my future home design.

XYZ should work the same as 3D CAD right? I'll just throw a triangle in to test it out first.

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