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Twisted Shed Roof - how?

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Using Home Designer Pro, can anyone advise how to draw a rectangular 'twisted' shed style roof? This 'mono pitch' roof has a regular 13 degree pitch with a constant facia height - easy thus far. However, I then wish to add a second pitch of 2.5 degrees along the ridge (i.e. perpendicular to the 13 degree pitch) - so one end of the ridge is higher than the other. The roof is a representation of an actual building  5ba7f1344e878_ScreenShot2018-09-23at20_59_12.thumb.png.7c8eae56322bd952269774b0314901d7.png and the rendered corrugations in the metal roof should run perpendicularly from ridge to facia as is the present situation (when not covered in snow). If I simply cut and modify a single plane roof running from the lowest facia point to the highest ridge point then the corrugations don't represent correctly.

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I see you said Pro, but ...

 

Answers often depend on which title (Suite, Pro etc) and version (2018, 2019 etc) you are using.

 

You can help everyone by adding this info to your signature (see below to turn them on, and see mine for an example) by clicking on your user name at the top right of the page, click Account Settings, then Signature on the left.

 

Doing so makes it always available, and keeps others from having to hunt for it.

 

And, turn on signature display too.

 

SIG.thumb.jpg.af17109346e9446432098056e258623d.jpg

 

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Resources for self help:

 

The built in Help System (always a good place to start)

 

 

 

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It's not clear from your description, or the image, what you want to do.

 

It looks like the right side has a steeper pitch than the left.

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I don't think you can create your roof with Home Designer or Chief Architect.

 

I will keep thinking about it.

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Many thanks for your help, although it's not great news. This is the first house I've remodelled with CAD and I purchased HD pro 2017 (& 18) specifically to help me with that exercise. It's been great for the most part but this is quite a limitation in its capabilities. So not quite a fall at the first hurdle but we seem unlikely to win the race on this horse. Are there any ChiefArchitect products that will enable this shed roof, with continuously variable pitch, to be correctly (and easily) represented? Alternately, perhaps a new feature request?

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I have never in my 25-year professional career been asked to create such a roof, ever. I have used Chief Architect Premier through that time. One could model a symbol in Sketch Up Pro to emulate such a roof and then import that symbol into Home Designer Pro for use. I think such ability is built into programs like ArchiCAD and Architectural Desktop by AutoDesk but those two programs are very pricey indeed compared to HD Pro and Chief Premier. I would recommend that you buy Sketch Up, make your roof symbol, place it in your HD Pro plan and be done with it, no need to spend thousands of dollars per year just to build one asymmetrical roof plane.

 

DJP

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"I have never in my 25-year professional career been asked to create such a roof, ever. I have used Chief Architect Premier through that time."

 

guess that somewhat answers why Chief Architect has never had this facility and also why the building's architect did what he did with the roof - it appears he was looking for something new or different to convention. However, it seems it was not novelty simply for the sake of it. The ridge end of the roof is facing north while the base is facing south. At this elevation (10,000ft) the sun can be intense with substantial solar gain. Tall windows are therefore not especially desirable in this circumstance and large areas of wall without windows can look a little brutal. This helps explains the horizontal baseline of conventional height. Conversely, the northern elevation is continually in shade and facing 14,000 ft mountain views - so he added clerestory windows to increase northern light entering the building and help balance interior illumination.... but, they are not simply rectangular - they follow the angled ridge line (picture attached). From inside the property these trapezoidal clerestory windows are a key feature to the room and along with the increasing hight adds subtle interest, grandeur and style that sympathises with the mountain views beyond - perhaps this would not be so effective with a more conventional 'simple' shed roof, partly used here to keep construction and maintenance costs low without appearing 'cheap'.

Screen Shot 2018-09-26 at 14.17.57.png

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