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447Debbie

Invisible Walls, Soffits, and unwanted Crown Molding

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I'm trying to create an entry way with a soffit to divide the 12' entryway and the 12' family room.  So far so good.  Now, I would like crown molding in the family room.  So far so good.  But, I don't want crown molding in the entry way.  How do I get rid of the crown molding in the entry way.  

 

Also, how do I complete the wall with drywall where it's just showing bare wood?

 

Yes, I know my roof is -12" from my ceiling level of 10'.  I'm doing that to stay under the 30' height restriction so I know there is an angle on the ceiling in the entry way.

Untitled_1.zip

junk.jpg

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Open the entryway room and remove the molding.

 

Try a doorway across the opening where the drywall is missing.

 

And I did not look at the plan.

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Open the invisible wall with the unwanted crown molding, and change it to a room divider wall.

Both problems go away.

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5 hours ago, Jo_Ann said:

Open the invisible wall with the unwanted crown molding, and change it to a room divider wall.

Both problems go away.

You're right.  I could have sworn I tried that.  Thank you.

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Still having the same issue.  My room divider wall keeps changing to an invisible wall.  The only change I made is that I now want the living room ceiling at 11' whereas before I had it at 12'.  So now, the entryway ceiling and the living room ceiling are different heights.  I read in an older thread that Home Designer Pro makes this change so there is an enclosed area defined by the platforn step created from two different ceiling heights.   I was doing this with a soffit.  Now that I have different ceiling heights, I can't get this to work at all.  I want crown molding on the living room side, but not on the entryway side.  I want an 11' ceiling in the family room, 12' ceiling in this entry way portion, 9' ceiling in the kitchen, and 9' ceiling in the hallway going off to the left to the garage side.  Why am I doing this?  Because I have to keep the roof line down as I'm struggling with a restriction to stay within a 30' height restriction from natural grade.

 

This is ridiculous.  I've spent OVER FOUR HOURS trying to get this one entry way the way I want it.   It shouldn't be this difficult to do this.  This is a bug and needs to be fixed!  I GIVE UP!


 

 

Untitled_2.zip

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Try this work-around.
The invisible wall placement is strategic.  You will also have to realign the attic wall above it.
Looks like you have a lot of upper cabinet fixing to do.
Did you notice that your hall country buffet has knobs above it in the air?

 

image.thumb.png.e7ff05aa6a2fbf68e55587e1cceab827.png    image.thumb.png.e8a5ee90c9b23c25655a06d088113186.png   image.thumb.png.d21531b3cd6cce8e9312ec6334e6e97d.png

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Yeah, the knobs in the air are a confirmed bug in the program.  They were told about it back when I still had Home Designer Pro 2018.  I assume it won't ever be fixed.

 

Definitely have upper cabinet fixing to do, but that's easy compared to this ceiling problem.  Still can't get it.

I don't understand why this program is drawing attic walls that aren't aligned as I'm surely not drawing walls in the attic.  I contacted customer support and they suggested I do this with manual ceiling planes.  That didn't work either.

 

I've now gone back to trying to achieve 10' ceilings in the kitchen and 12' ceilings in the family room surrounded by "soffits" at the 10' height so they match up to the kitchen ceiling height.  That will solve the cabinet height problem but I can't figure out how to get the 12' ceiling underneath the roof without the program adding a raised portion on the roof.  I would certainly think I could do this by manually creating a ceiling plane at the wall and lowering it by two feet in effect making a soffit but it should be better than a soffit because I would think the framing would at least recognize it.  Still no luck.  Would you know how to do this?  Plan is attached.  Once I get this done, I'll be battling the entry way again, which needs a 12' ceiling because of the chandelier I have but I want to separate it from the family room so that the family room ceiling is a four sided rectangle.

 

Basically I want a 12' ceiling in the great room surrounded by soffits that drop down to the 10' height and I'm at my maximum height with the HOA so I can't raise the roof.

Untitled_4.zip

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Surely you know that you can't raise ceilings with 'auto rebuild roof' turned on, because the roof will rebuild to accomodate the taller ceilings?

 

If you raise the buffet-hutch to the default height of 94.6", the knobs won't be up in the air.

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10' ceiling, taller windows.

 

ht1.thumb.png.d51e41a588247d8fa4381cd0754e9d94.png

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Jo_Ann,

 

I'm trying to lower the ceilng at the edge though, not raise it. If the program is rebuiding then I took that to mean that the ceiling was running into the roof.  I was trying the soffits, or the lowered ceiling plane, to get it under the existing roof structure.

 

I realize if I use the default on the buffet it will have the knobs in the right place, but my actual hutch that I own is NOT the default size so the default one really doesn't do me any good.

 

Solver,

 

I had 10' ceilings to begin with. along with taller windows.  Then I started talking to the 'energy vanguard' gurus (actually well respected well known people) about the Manual J, S, T, D, etc., who turned me in the opposite direction.  Add to that the fact that I want the ductwork in the basement ceiling/main level floor, I was told to reduce the size of the windows and go with 9' ceilings as a default (like the bedrooms, laundry, bathrooms, etc.)  So, the only way to reduce the window sizes and still have high ceilings that look good is to put a soffit around the perimeter.  I had it looking pretty good, it looked like a tray ceiling, but there wasn't enough room above the plates for the required amount of insulation.  I went with 12' in the family room because I absolutely need a 12' section in the entry for the family heirloom chandelier that is 30w x 45h.  The 9' default almost works because most of the other areas that I want with high ceilings have the balcony and porch on the exterior so that extends the roof out which I thought would be far enough so that it was up enough above the plates on the outside walls of the family room and kitchen.  No problem with the 10' in the kitchen, but the family room and the entry way are a different story. 

I do have the email that states putting the ductwork in the attic is just a "we've always done it that way' sort of thing, rather than physics and cold air dropping being the real reason.  Current energy gurus state if you have a tight house, currently most new construction would/should be that way, there will be no problem putting the supply registers in the floor, vs. the ceiling.  But that's off topic here.  I was just anticipating further questions on the subject.  I think this person will also try to steer me into going with a ventilated attic as well.  All this from a very well known person in the HVAC field.

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12 hours ago, solver said:

No idea what your problems are, but I did quickly make a new hutch, and fixed the roof.

 

Why 12' ceilings and why soffits around the perimeter?

 

Default Ceiling 9 Window Downsizing 1700 sq ft 01-18-2020 (eric).zip

Solver - I was trying to knock down the height of this wall, in the red rectangle by using soffits or a manual ceiling plane about 12" - 18" deep.  I don't think it can be built and insulated with the top chord sitting right on the plate like that.

Image2.jpg

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2 hours ago, 447Debbie said:

Solver - I was trying to knock down the height of this wall, in the red rectangle by using soffits or a manual ceiling plane about 12" - 18" deep.  I don't think it can be built and insulated with the top chord sitting right on the plate like that.

Image2.jpg

I was also trying to provide more space for the chandelier in the entry way by cutting into the soffit in the family room, while also making that part of the soffit only 12" high, instead of 24" high.  Once I started doing that and adding crown molding to the family room all kinds of strange things started happening as I could not for the life of me stop the crown molding from generating in a six inch space of the entry.  

 

Image 5 shows what happens when I try to move that soffit out of the entryway to make the entryway ceiling space larger.  Then the crown molding wraps around the soffit and into the entryway!  It's not room molding as room molding won't draw on the soffit, I have to use soffit molding.  This is just a nightmare. FWIW, the room molding draws on two of the five soffits.  It won't draw on the shorter soffit of the soffit along the wall in image 5, and it won't draw on one of the outside walls.  I don't want crown molding on the soffit that's on the side of the entryway ceiling as shown in images 5 & 7.

 

Image6.jpg

Image8.jpg

Image5.jpg

Image7.jpg

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I think what you are saying, is that using soffits for the trey ceiling will not build your framing correctly,

to show a lower wall/ceiling on the exterior family room wall.

Maybe this approach will get what you want?

 

image.thumb.png.8f3e097123b434da011dba5c755fc291.png

 

image.thumb.png.f64a4daf90a5d883b6a9e5dea42d1166.png

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2 hours ago, Jo_Ann said:

I think what you are saying, is that using soffits for the trey ceiling will not build your framing correctly,

to show a lower wall/ceiling on the exterior family room wall.

Maybe this approach will get what you want?

 

image.thumb.png.8f3e097123b434da011dba5c755fc291.png

 

image.thumb.png.f64a4daf90a5d883b6a9e5dea42d1166.png

Yes, that is basically my problem. 

I finally ended up sending an email off to the truss manufacturer to see if they'll be able to incorporate the interior soffits into the trusses so that the outside wall can effectively be lowered to allow for enough insulation at the top plates.  I'm envisioning the plates on the outside wall to be in the same plane with with the bottom of the interior soffits.  Hopefully they'll know what I'm asking.   I could probably do this with a more elaborate roof, but I'm trying to keep is simple to keep the costs down and to avoid leaks.  I might have to take that ceiling down to 11', but I think that's a waste since construction materials (drywall, sheathing, etc.,) are built around 8', 9', and 12' heights.  

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On 1/18/2020 at 8:32 PM, solver said:

No idea what your problems are, but I did quickly make a new hutch, and fixed the roof.

 

Why 12' ceilings and why soffits around the perimeter?

 

Default Ceiling 9 Window Downsizing 1700 sq ft 01-18-2020 (eric).zip

I've been using this file now and I keep getting the notice that it was created in Chief Architect, probably because that's where you edited it.  It also tells me I may not be able to do certain things with the file.  Should I not be using this?  Am I going to find out later on down the road that there will be something I cannot do with this file?

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You should not have problems, but I cannot guarantee that.

 

There is a checkbox in Chief that says Allow Editing In Select Home Designer Products. I checked it before saving.

 

There are features in Chief not in Home Designer and you would not be able to edit those, but none were used in your file.

 

I don't remember what I did other than deleting a bunch of things.

 

 

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